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How Scotland found themselves 13 minutes from history

Just one goal was the difference between a place in the last eight and an early exit at Euro 96.

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After waiting decades to reach their first European Championships in 1992, Scotland were back just four years later.

With UEFA appointing England as Euro 96 host and expanding the size of the competition, Scotland had to be there.

A bigger party, and right on our doorstep? Missing out would have been unthinkable.

The national team was now in the hands of Craig Brown, the avuncular coach who stepped up to the top job after Andy Roxburgh’s resignation in 1993.

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Brown steered the group through qualification, finishing second behind Russia and reaching the finals as one of the best runners-up. Now, his task was to do what had never been done before and take Scotland beyond the first round of a major tournament.

Battle of Britain

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Craig Brown and Terry Venables at the Euro 96 draw which paired Scotland with England.

The draw pitted Scotland against Switzerland and Netherlands, with one team left to be picked and a 50% chance of it being Terry Venables’ England side.

“Will it be England and Scotland?” asked Barry Davies in his commentary on the draw ceremony. “107 meetings they’ve had. 43-40 it stands in England’s favour. Are we to have another one?

“Yes we are!”

Experience counted

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Brown had evolved the squad since the last tournament and only eight players from Euro 92 were in his 22-man selection. Ten were aged 30 or over, with Aberdeen forward Scott Booth the youngest at 24.

The manager had a side heavy on experience and plenty of options across the field, but the first match provided a considerable test.

The Netherlands team was built largely on the Ajax side that won the previous year’s Champions League. Six of those players, including Edwin van der Saar, Clarence Seedorf, and Edgar Davids, were in manager Guus Hiddink’s starting line-up.

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Clarence Seedorf fails to beat Andy Goram from a free-kick.

Brown sparked few major surprises when he named his team, but he had a big call to make in goals. Jim Leighton had been handed the number one shirt, but Rangers keeper Andy Goram was many people’s call as first choice.

Goram got the nod and didn’t let his manager down. The goalie made a reflex save from Gaston Taument early in the game and carried on from there as Scotland put in a stubborn performance to thwart a Dutch side that were clearly in the mood.

A Gary McAllister free-kick had Edwin van der Sar at full stretch, but Scotland chances were few and far between. Seedorf and Bergkamp both had opportunities in the first half, but the superstars of the Oranje couldn’t find the goal they wanted.

The second half delivered more Dutch chances, with Seedorf seeing a shot deflected over the bar, while a John Collins handball on the line was missed by the referee. But the final whistle came without Scotland conceding and with a point to show for their efforts.

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It set things up nicely for the big one.

Heading down Wembley way

Though England and Scotland’s rivalry was in its 124th year, the pair had never met at a major finals.

While England were hoping that hosting duties could help the team repeat their 1966 success, Scotland’s focus was on emulating the 1967 team that taught the world champions a lesson.

It wasn’t going to be easy. England had a talented squad including the likes of Alan Shearer, Teddy Sheringham, Paul Ince and David Platt, as well as the central figure of the inimitable Paul Gascoigne.

Scotland fans couldn’t even dismiss Gazza as ‘not that good’ as he’d just won a league and cup double, as well as a couple of individual awards, in his first season with Rangers.

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Scotland fans made themselves heard at Wembley.

At Wembley, with the home support confident “Football’s coming home”, Scotland’s travelling contingent were hoping to celebrate the greatest of all away days.

The first half showed Scotland had retained all the determination and discipline that served them well against Netherlands, with the midfield trio of Gary McAllister, Stuart McCall and John Collins impressing even if they couldn’t provide steady supply to John Spencer and Gordon Durie.

England were also having trouble carving out golden chances and the game was goalless at half time.

Less than ten minutes after the break, though, Darren Anderton released Gary Neville on the right, the Manchester United full-back crossed and Shearer showed why he was one of the best strikers in the world, finding space at the back post and steering a header beyond Goram.

With a lead to defend, England sat back as Scotland went in search of an equaliser. Their big chance came when Durie was brought down by Tony Adams and the referee awarded a penalty. McAllister, who had scored from the spot at the previous Euros, took responsibility.

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Gordon Durie is fouled by Tony Adams for Scotland’s penalty.

The ball moved just before being struck, McAllister’s shot was stopped by David Seaman and every Scot had their head in their hands.

By the time they raised their eyes again, England were breaking up the park. Gascoigne collected the ball outside the Scotland box, lobbed Colin Hendry and smacked a volley past his Rangers teammate Goram to make it 2-0.

Game over.

Would the Swiss roll over?

Up next was Switzerland in a must-win game. The Swiss had drawn 1-1 with England in their opening match but followed it up with a 2-0 defeat at the hands of Netherlands.

Scotland’s chances of making the knockout stages were slim and depended not only on victory combined with England beating the Dutch, but also a five-goal swing. Plenty of Scots assumed that was well beyond reach.

Brown brought Chelsea’s Craig Burley into the team and handed a start to Ally McCoist, who had come off the bench against England and was still in search of a first goal at a major finals.

Scotland went into the final game knowing their chances were slim.

The night’s drama began at Wembley where Shearer put England ahead from the spot. So far, so good but with Scotland still needing a goal and more.

McCoist delivered in style after 36 minutes. The veteran striker thumped a shot from outside the box that curled inside Marco Pascolo’s near post. Now it might come down to goal difference.

Back at Wembley, things were going England’s way and to Scotland’s advantage. Sheringham made it 2-0, then Shearer struck again and Sheringham made it four. In the space of 11 second-half minutes, the hugely improbable had become entirely possible.

Scotland threw Colin Hendry forward as they pushed for a second goal, but when news of the 4-0 scoreline at Wembley filtered through, he was hastily restored to the heart of the defence. Never a high-scoring team, Brown had clearly realised hopes were better resting on a solid back line.

Still, with 13 minutes to go, Scotland were heading to the knockout rounds.

Dutch devastation

With their own hopes looking beyond shaky, the Dutch made a change at Wembley, putting Kluivert on for Peter Hoekstra. The young forward, who already had a Champions League-winning goal to his name, slotted the ball through Seaman’s legs to make it 4-1.

In normal circumstances, the final goal in a defeat like that is a mere consolation. Not when it comes to the Scottish football team. Kluivert’s goal put Netherlands and Scotland level on points, inseparable on the head-to head after their draw, and with the same goal difference.

But it also put the Dutch ahead on goals scored, and there ended Scotland’s hopes.

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The Tartan Army packed out Villa Park.

The team returned north bitterly disappointed but with no little credit.

A second Euros left the nation with a record of six played, two won and one drawn having faced some of the continent’s toughest teams.

Nobody would believe it would take 25 years for a chance to add to that record.

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Tartan Army fans celebrate Scotland’s 0-0 draw with England

Supporters were out in force celebrating the result which keeps Scotland's Euro 2020 hopes alive.

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Tartan Army fans gathered in London to celebrate Scotland’s 0-0 draw with England.

Scotland put in a superb performance to earn a draw with England at Wembley on Friday night in their second game of Euro 2020.

A win over Croatia at Hampden on Tuesday should be enough to reach their first ever major tournament knockout stage.

Supporters were out in force in London celebrating the result which keeps Scotland’s Euro 2020 hopes alive.

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Red flares were set off as crowds congregated in Leicester Square for the much-anticipated match.

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Euro hopes: Scotland fans celebrate draw with England.

Many fans were wearing kilts and draped in Scotland flags, singing and cheering in the popular tourist spot.

Others kicked footballs and many belted out the Scottish national anthem and chanted “No Scotland, no party”.

The Metropolitan Police said officers entered Leicester Square at about 12.45am and encouraged those still at the scene to leave the area, with the square finally cleared by 1.15am.

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No Scotland, no party: Crowds gather in Leicester Square.
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A total of 30 people were arrested in central London as part of the policing operation for the Euros clash.

The force added 25 of the arrests were in central London while five people were arrested in the vicinity of Wembley.

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Fans were seen climbing into the fountain of William Shakespeare.

Scotland Yard said in a tweet: “13 arrests were for public order offences, six for drunk and disorderly, four for assault on police, three for assault, two related to Class A drugs and one each for breaching a dispersal order and breaching a banning order.”

Meanwhile in Scotland, fans displayed their home support by gathering in Glasgow’s George Square to celebrate the result.

Supporters also gathered at an official Euros fan zone in Glasgow to watch the Auld Enemy clash.

It was the biggest event in the city since the pandemic began despite concerns it could lead to a spike in coronavirus cases.

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Home support: Scots watch the game at Glasgow’s fan zone.

Up to 6000 people each day – split into two 3000 sessions – have been able to watch Euros matches at Glasgow Green if they have a ticket.

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Following the game, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon tweeted: “Yes, sir, you all boogied.”

This week, thousands of Scotland fans travelled to London despite warnings they should not go unless they have a match ticket, or a safe place to watch the game.

Wembley only had 25% capacity for the game, and Scotland supporters were not able to access the traditional Trafalgar Square meeting place as it had been reserved as a fan zone for key workers.

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We’ll be coming: Scotland fans in London.

The First Minister urged members of the Tartan Army to “please, please, please try to behave in a way that is a safe as possible”.

Speaking at the Scottish Government’s Covid briefing on Friday, Nicola Sturgeon said: “The virus doesn’t care about football, it is not going to give you a free pass because you are there celebrating a football match.”


‘England draw was a big moment for Steve Clarke’

STV pundit David Moyes says the Scotland manager deserves plenty of praise for Wembley performance.

West Ham United manager David Moyes gave his views on STV.

STV pundit and West Ham United manager David Moyes gives his assessment of Scotland’s draw with England at Wembley.

Well done to Steve Clarke and the Scotland players – they did a great job.

Considering the team we were up against and all the hype about England winning the tournament, it was a good performance.

As a manager, that is a big moment for Steve Clarke, who would have been feeling a lot of pressure after not winning the first game then having to come to one of the favourites.

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So I have got to say ‘well done, Steve’.

We were all saying beforehand that we would take a draw all day long as we knew that would give us a shot of getting through.

It was huge and now we have to be ready for the next game, when a win against Croatia should see us qualify.

The players can enjoy it, then we are back into the battle again and getting ready for Tuesday.

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David Moyes was speaking to STV presenter Raman Bhardwaj

Scotland v Croatia is live on STV and the STV Player from 7pm on Tuesday.


In pictures: Scotland’s hard-fought draw at Wembley

Some of the best images from Scotland's 0-0 draw with England at Wembley.

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Lyndon Dykes has a shot cleared off the line.

Scotland picked up a crucial Euro 2020 point by drawing 0-0 with England at Wembley on Friday night.

Here’s some images which sum up the Scotland performance.

Stephen O’Donnell nearly opens the scoring

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Billy Gilmour runs the show

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Scots show great team spirit

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Scotland survive late stramash

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Steve Clarke salutes the Scotland fans

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Tense times for the Tartan Army at the fan zone

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Che Adams goes close

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Smiles at full-time


Funding of £215m pledged to close schools’ attainment gap

It will see head teachers across the country share £147m in Pupil Equity Funding in 2021-22.

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In addition, the nine councils with the highest concentrations of deprivation in Scotland – known as Challenge Authorities – will share a further £43m.

Schools will receive a record £215m funding for efforts to close the poverty attainment gap this year, with the new education secretary saying such work is “more vital than ever” due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Shirley-Anne Somerville said the cash, the largest sum ever handed out in a single year to tackle the issue, will fund “targeted help” for the most disadvantaged students.

It will see head teachers across the country share £147m in Pupil Equity Funding in 2021-22, with the money going directly to schools for them to determine how best to use it.

In addition, the nine councils with the highest concentrations of deprivation in Scotland – known as Challenge Authorities – will share a further £43m.

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Work to help improve the attainment of youngsters who have been in care, including through schemes such as mentoring programmes, will receive up to £12m.

A further £7m will be shared between 73 additional schools with the highest concentration of pupils from deprived areas, with the same amount going to national programmes, including those run by the third-sector, which work to raise attainment.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has previously pledged that tackling the attainment gap is a top priority, but her SNP Government has come under fire from opponents on its record in this area.

Somerville, who was appointed education secretary after May’s Holyrood election, stressed “closing the poverty-related attainment gap and ensuring every young person has the chance to fulfil their potential remains central to this Government’s work”.

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She added: “Our ambition is a long-term one and we know that the challenges presented by the pandemic mean our efforts to deliver equity in education are more vital than ever.

“This first instalment of the expanded Attainment Scotland Fund, with record funding of more than £215 million, will allow headteachers, schools, councils and other partners to provide targeted help for some of our most disadvantaged pupils.

“We are providing investment across a number of diverse programmes which will benefit looked-after children, support pupils in our most deprived areas and empower headteachers to invest their funding on initiatives that are right for the children in their schools.”


Scotland prove a point with pulsating performance at Wembley

The national team produced a confident display against England to keep their Euro 2020 hopes alive.

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Scotland matched England in every department in a well-contested game.

Scotland took a point from England but left their mark on Wembley after a statement performance from Steve Clarke’s side saw the national team keep their hopes of Euro 2020 progress alive.

A draw was a fair result after both sides had chances but failed to take them, but Scotland leave London with more credit after matching a team with a higher reputation and loftier aspirations.

Clarke and his players can now relish Tuesday’s encounter with Croatia at Hampden, hoping to replicate a performance of energy, discipline and purpose, but with added goals if they are to progress to the knockout stages.

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Steve Clarke salutes the Tartan Army at full-time.

After the deflating disappointment of their opening day defeat to Czech Republic, Scotland needed a lift and a pulsating 90 minutes under Wembley’s arch proved that the team aren’t out of place at Europe’s top table this summer.

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Clarke and his players had arrived in London full of hope despite the opening day defeat to the Czech Republic that saw the excitement of being back at a major tournament turn to dismay. The head coach had been adamant that the performance of the team had been encouraging, though he knew that his side couldn’t pass up as many chances again.

Both he and Scott McTominay said during their pre-match duties that Scotland would need to take at least a point but for both, not to mention the thousands of fans who had invaded the capital, the appetite was for a victory in this historic fixture.

The supporters, and the squad, were boosted with news that Kieran Tierney had been passed fit to play after the calf injury that kept him out of the loss to the Czechs. Tierney is one of a handful of elite-level players in the squad and the national team would need every one against an England side that has quality in depth.

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John Stones hit the post with this first-half header.

As expected, the Arsenal defender took his place in the starting line-up in front of a quarter-full Wembley, where the 3200 Scotland fans were making their noisy presence known.

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Clarke had a surprise in his selection with four changes, including one bold choice. Billy Gilmour, the 20-year-old who has made a breakthrough into the first-team picture at Champions League winners Chelsea, was handed a starting spot. The midfielder was alongside Callum McGregor and John McGinn in the centre of the park, with Scott McTominay part of the back three. Lyndon Dykes and Che Adams were partnered up front in a team that, on paper, had solidity but also a chance to ask questions of England.

Gareth Southgate had seen his England selection questioned before their opening game but a 1-0 win over Croatia had ensured a positive start for the hosts.

It was Scotland who made a positive start on Friday, with Che Adams taking a touch to control a Stephen O’Donnell cross before firing in a shot that John Stones had to block but the England defender went closer minutes later.

An England corner was curled in and Stone rose unmarked to powerfully head towards goal but saw the ball come off the post. Soon afterwards Phil Foden had a chance and after John McGinn was booked and England’s support smelled blood, things began to look a little fraught.

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Stephen O’Donnell’s shot forced a great save from Jordan Pickford.

It just took a spell of possession to restore Scotland’s calm. After holding on to the ball for a little longer than the Wembley crowd expected, murmurs turned to boos from the home fans as the direction of play turned. Gilmour, McGregor and McGinn started to gain the upper hand in midfield, Tierney shot over the bar and Adams and Lyndon Dykes turned over play with constant hustle. There was an intensity in the stadium with what some had predicted as a one-sided game turning out to be a well-matched battle.

Not that Scotland could get comfortable. After a quiet start, Harry Kane reminded the defence of his danger when he headed wide of David Marshall’s goal. The flag was up but the striker’s ability to slip away and find space needed to be noted.

Scotland soon served notice of their own danger with a golden chance of their own. Tierney and Robertson combined on the left and the Arsenal defender arced a ball to the back post. O’Donnell met it as it dropped and his volley was saved by Jordan Pickford and Adams headed the rebound wide. The Tartan Army made their approval known.

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England continued to probe and hold possession at length but looked short on ideas and unable to create and with Scotland settling in, the crowd grew restless and a little nervy. As half-time drew near, the sporadic outbreaks of Three Lions has faded away and been replaced by frustrated whistling. England knew they were in a game.

If Clarke had the easier half-time team talk, Southgate had the most effective. England came out roaring, forcing an early corner and then keeping Marshall on his toes when Mason Mount put a shot on target after Kane, Raheem Sterling and Phil Foden had combined in the build-up. The Wembley crowd were won over again and were behind their team.

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Scotland players celebrate their point at full-time.

A Robertson break down the wing showed it wasn’t one-way traffic but England were alive again and Foden was electric, bringing fans to their feet with one mazy run and causing concern in the Scotland ranks with his pace and movement.

After riding out a tough spell, the visitors forced a corner just after the hour mark and it brought respite as much as opportunity.

Scotland had another major chance when a corner found its way to Dykes. The forward smashed in a powerful shot but saw Reece James head it away.

England made a change, surprisingly withdrawing Foden to introduce Jack Grealish but the substitution of one elite talent for another made no real impact on Scotland, who continued to defend resolutely but also build play and look for openings in a controlled and confident manner.

Clarke’s side still had to soak up pressure in spells and be wary of England’s big names but there was a demonstration of their effective defending, but also England’s slightly lacklustre showing in attack, when Kane was subbed off for Marcus Rashford.

Scotland made a change of their own when Stuart Armstrong came on to replace Gilmour, who was feted for a performance as good as any on the pitch.

Sterling had claims for a penalty waved away and England seemed desperate as the game entered the final ten minutes. Scotland stroked the ball about to provoke boos from the home support and Kevin Nisbet replaced Adams in a move that signalled that there was still more than a single point to be aimed for.

A chorus of Flower of Scotland started in the 88th minute and its rise in volume over the grumbling of the England fans told the story of who was happier as the final whistle neared.

After a disciplined and clever showing, there was still time for brief panic though. A traditional stramash in the Scotland box had hearts in mouths before McGinn thumped the ball upfield and seconds later the contest was brought to an end.

England trudged off to face questions about their disappointing showing but Scotland took plaudits to go with their point.


Scotland ‘proved how good they are’ in Wembley draw

Steve Clarke was full of praise for his players after drawing 0-0 with England at Wembley.

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Steve Clarke believes Scotland “proved how good they are” in their 0-0 draw with England at Wembley.

Scotland produced a superb performance and created a number of good chances to win, but the draw is enough to keep their Euro 2020 hopes alive.

A win over Croatia at Hampden on Tuesday should be enough to reach their first ever major tournament knockout stage.

Scotland manager Clarke had particular praise for debutant Billy Gilmour and right wing-back Stephen O’Donnell, who he felt had been unfairly criticised after Monday’s game with Czech Republic.

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O’Donnell came close to opening the scoring, while Gilmour was named man of the match.

Clarke told STV: “I am delighted for the players and staff, it was a great performance.

“We knew we would have to suffer a bit at times out of possession, but I was delighted with the way we played with the ball as well.

“We created chances, I have always said that we are a good team.

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“I thought the reaction after the game on Monday was a little bit over the top, but it’s nice to close a few voices down.

“I think we showed the real Scotland on Monday, and we were harshly criticised for it.”

Clarke made four changes from the opening game defeat, bringing in Gilmour, Che Adams and Callum McGregor, while Arsenal defender Kieran Tierney returned from injury.

He believes his squad answered those who criticised their performance in the 2-0 defeat to Czech Republic.

He said: “I have said for a long time that we have a good group of players and they proved that again tonight. We hope it will get us into the next stage of the competition.

“I was hoping Stephen O’Donnell would score as he was very unfairly criticised the other night and his performance tonight was outstanding.

“If he scored that goal, it would have been justice for the boy, he’s a good player.

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“It was never in doubt with Billy, he is a really top player, we know what he has got. Unfortunately his legs ran out towards the end, but he doesn’t get much football for Chelsea. He has trained really well with the group and we were delighted to get him on the pitch.

“It’s going to be a big game on Tuesday, I hope the fans enjoy the night and behave themselves and get back home safely.”

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All adults ‘expected to receive first Covid vaccine by July 18’

The time between doses of the coronavirus vaccine has been reduced from 12 weeks to eight.

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All adults in Scotland are on track to receive their first dose of a coronavirus vaccine by July 18, Nicola Sturgeon has said.

The coronavirus vaccine rollout is being sped up after the lifting of restrictions in Scotland was delayed.

Those who have received their first dose of a Covid-19 jag will wait a month less for the second with the timescale reduced from 12 weeks between doses to eight weeks.

The First Minister said: “Vaccines are the way back to normality. I think we are increasingly confident of that.

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“Quite literally every single one of us who gets these jabs is representing a step back towards normal life.”

On Thursday, Scotland recorded its highest number of new coronavirus cases in a day since late January.

Nicola Sturgeon made the announcement at a briefing on Friday afternoon, where she said plans for how the country will move beyond the least restrictive stage of the government’s five-tier system – level zero – will be published next week.

She said that all 18 to 19-year-olds should have received their vaccine appointment invitations by next week.

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She said: “If you are aged 18 to 29 and you haven’t had an appointment sent to you by next weekend, please go to the appointment checker page on the NHS Inform website so that you can make sure you can get an appointment arranged.”

The First Minister announced a temporary travel ban between Scotland and a number of virus hotspots in England.

Non-essential travel is no longer allowed to and from Manchester and Salford and existing bans for Bolton and Blackburn remain in place.

Sturgeon said: “Anyone travelling elsewhere in the Greater Manchester or Lancashire area, I’d ask to think carefully about whether your journey is really necessary, because we do see cases rising across that region.”

However, travel to and from Bedford will be allowed from the weekend as will travel to the Republic of Ireland – although visitors to Ireland are still expected to quarantine.

Sturgeon also said the government intends to extend the increased notice period for evictions.

Legislation to extend the protection, along with other emergency measures such as changes to how courts operate, by six months will be presented to parliament next week.

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Sturgeon said: “Although we are on that journey back to normality and some measures are no longer needed, we are not quite there yet, so we need to keep some of these in place for a bit longer.”

The Scottish Parliament extended the emergency law until September 30, 2021, but there is no eviction ban in areas that are in level two or lower.

But from January 22, 2021, if you live in an area under either coronavirus protection level three or four, Sheriff Officers cannot currently evict you.

Plumber finishes run from Hampden to Wembley in time for match

Alex Woodward decided to take on the charity challenge after a cancer scare last year.

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The 26-year-old from Bothwell, South Lanarkshire, completed the 390 mile journey at 2pm on Friday.

A plumber has completed an epic run from Hampden to Wembley in time to see the long-awaited Scotland v England Euros clash.

Alex Woodward, ran the 15 marathons in 15 days to raise funds to build a football centre in Glasgow’s east end.

The 26-year-old from Bothwell, South Lanarkshire, completed the 390-mile journey at around 2pm on Friday.

“It’s just the best feeling ever. Seeing my family and friends, everybody just there it’s easily one of the greatest feelings of my life,” Alex told STV News.

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Alex Woodward set off from Hampden and ran to Wembley in 15 days.
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“Because I took it one day at a time, I was so in the zone, I wasn’t thinking about anything else. It almost feels like [I was] running, running, running… then I’ve lifted my head and here I am at Wembley.

“It was only possible because I took it one day at a time, so I almost surprised myself when I turned up here, I was like ‘wow, that’s it done’.”

Family and friends had travelled down to welcome him at Wembley where he also bumped into Scotland midfielder Scott Brown.

Alex has already raised more than £38,000 through the gruelling challenge and, having reached the finish line, is looking forward to Friday night’s match.

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A shock tumour diagnosis and cancer scare last year inspired Alex to take on the challenge. In August, medics discovered a growth on a nerve on his lower back. 

Although he found out he was cancer-free, he could face surgery to remove the tumour which may lose him the use of his right leg.

But, Alex said, despite it being the most difficult time he has ever been through it has granted him a “new lease of life”.

He wanted to celebrate his ability to function healthily and use his battle to help others by raising £50,000 for a community football centre in Glasgow.

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Finnart AFC was established in Bridgeton in 1979 to create a community club and safe environment for youngsters to play football.

The new facility will be a home for the club and be a centre for sport, health, education and wellbeing for children in need.

To find out more and donate to Alex’s fundraiser visit here.

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CCTV appeal after racist incident towards child on train

It is believed that the man may have information that can assist officers with their investigation.

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CCTV: If you recognise the man, contact British Transport Police.

Police have appealed for information following a racist incident directed towards a child on a train.

CCTV images have been released by British Transport Police of a man who officers wish to speak to in relation to the incident, which took place on the Bridgeton to Dalmuir service at around 4pm on Saturday, March 20.

It is believed that the man may have information that can assist officers with their investigation

Police have urged the man, or any members of the public who recognise him, to contact them.

CCTV images have been released by British Transport Police.
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He is described as approximately 60-years-old, of a heavy build, with short, greyish hair and glasses.

He was wearing a blue Adidas hooded top with three white stripes down the sleeves with a black shirt underneath, blue trousers, black trainers and he was carrying a white shopping bag.

British Transport Police can be contacted by text on 61016 or by calling 0800 40 50 40 quoting reference 2100018087.

Information can also be given anonymously to Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.


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