Scotland falls silent to remember the fallen on Armistice Day

Services held around the country at 11am to honour those who have lost their lives in conflict.

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Scotland fell silent on Thursday morning to remember those who have lost their lives in conflict.

A two-minute silence took place across the country at 11am, marking 102 years since the first two-minute silence was observed on Armistice Day, November 11, 1919.

Among those observing the silence were delegates attending the COP26 UN climate change summit.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, COP26 president Alok Sharma and UN secretary general Antonio Guterres paid their respects at the UK pavilion on Thursday morning.

Screens at the pavilion also displayed poppies.

A single gun was fired at 11am from Edinburgh Castle, while local government officials from the city joined members of the Armed Forces for a wreath laying ceremony at the Edinburgh Garden of Remembrance in Princes Street Gardens.

Remembrance Service at Princes Street Gardens in Edinburgh.STV News
Remembrance Service at Princes Street Gardens in Edinburgh.

The Royal British Legion Scotland’s national padre, reverend Dr Karen Campbell, led the open-air service including the reading of Binyon’s Lines and the Kohima Epitaph.

Wreaths were laid by the deputy lord provost of the City of Edinburgh, councillor Joan Griffiths, and representatives from Legion Scotland, Poppyscotland and Veterans Scotland.

The ceremony also marks the centenary of the Royal British Legion Scotland.

Meanwhile, Holyrood’s presiding officer Alison Johnstone led a two-minute silence to mark Armistice Day in the Scottish Parliament alongside opposition leaders and deputy first minister John Swinney.

Holyrood’s presiding officer Alison Johnstone led a two-minute silence to mark Armistice Day in the Scottish Parliament.Scottish Parliament TV
Holyrood’s presiding officer Alison Johnstone led a two-minute silence to mark Armistice Day in the Scottish Parliament.

Prior to the silence, Johnstone read a short extract from Laurence Binyon’s Ode of Remembrance before The Last Post was played by a bugler.

Standing on the steps of parliament’s garden lobby, Johnstone then recited the Kohima Epitaph before SNP MSP Stuart Macmillan played the flowers of the forest folk song on the bagpipes.

Scotland’s men’s football team, currently at a Spanish training camp preparing for their crucial World Cup qualifier against Moldova on Friday, also paused to pay their respects.